Any tips on learning the notes on the guitar completely and fast?

Nov 23, 2005
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#1
Hey guys, I'm a pretty decent intermediate player when it comes to being a self taught person. However, now that I'm taking lessons and learning how to read notation it is obviously very crucial for me to be able to know where all of the notes on the guitar are.

I already know the notes on the low E string, A string, D string, G string, and high E string (obviously the same as the low E string) when it comes to playing moveable power chord shapes on those strings, but when it comes to pointing out a random note on a random fret there is still some hesitation in finding it.

I know that the notes from the 12th fret and on are basically the same, but all I need is a good method to sticking the note locations in my mind.

Do any of you guys have a good method to do this?
 
Sep 22, 2005
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ur mom
#2
just use your penis ;)



actually i don't know. i have trouble with that too.. just keep hitting one fret at a time and saying the note out loud.

repeat for hours a day. should have it down in no time ;)
 
Nov 23, 2005
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#3
just use your penis ;)



actually i don't know. i have trouble with that too.. just keep hitting one fret at a time and saying the note out loud.

repeat for hours a day. should have it down in no time ;)
Yeah, I hear ya. I just can't seem to stick to it, blah. Wonder if there's other ways?
 

ConanTL

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2005
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#4
There is one very good method which I think is called the "magic triangle".

If you are looking for a note on the 3rd or or 6th string do this:

Look for the note on the 1st (low E) now go down to strings and two frets to the right ... that's the same note (on the 3rd). Go from there to the 6th (high E) and go back two frets ... same note again.

Example ... you're looking for a G: G on the low E is on the 3rd fret. Go down two strings and two frets to the right. The G on the 3rd string is on the 5th fret. Go down to the high E and back two frets and you'll have the G on that string.

Here's the second method for finding notes on the 2nd, 4th and 5th string: Find the note on the 2nd. Go down two strings and 2 frets to the right ... same note. Now go down to the 5th string and go 4 frets to the left ... same note.

Example: You're looking for an F. On the second string that's on the 8th fret. Go two down and two to the right ... then the F is on the 4th string 10th fret. Go down 1 string and 4 to the left. The f on the 5th string is on the 6th fret.

There you go. All you need to know well are the notes on the 1st and 2nd string. The rest you can find with the "magic triangle".


edit:I think this is a good example on finding the "f"s. Just move the triangle left and right as needed.
 
Last edited:
Aug 31, 2005
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#6
You can't rush talent, practice practice practice.
Wouldnt say its talent to remember what notes go where, but practise is definatly the key. Sorry mate, hard work and studying is the only way to get good at it. Its a common misconception that musics a doss, people seem to think this especially with guitar.
 
Dec 11, 2005
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#7
learn how to play chords by learning tabs on the internet. pick a few easy songs from any band you like, print it out and start playin. this is a crucial part. i learned dozens of new chords that i would have never learned from a teacher by studying old incubus tabs.

when learning a riff, start off by playing it as slow as you can. play it over and over and over until you have memorised where to put your fingers. gradually pick up the speed until you can play it fast without messing up.

practice alot.
 

Liquid Tension

THE ATHEISTS NIGHTMARE!
Dec 12, 2004
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#8
There is one very good method which I think is called the "magic triangle".

If you are looking for a note on the 3rd or or 6th string do this:

Look for the note on the 1st (low E) now go down to strings and two frets to the right ... that's the same note (on the 3rd). Go from there to the 6th (high E) and go back two frets ... same note again.

Example ... you're looking for a G: G on the low E is on the 3rd fret. Go down two strings and two frets to the right. The G on the 3rd string is on the 5th fret. Go down to the high E and back two frets and you'll have the G on that string.

Here's the second method for finding notes on the 2nd, 4th and 5th string: Find the note on the 2nd. Go down two strings and 2 frets to the right ... same note. Now go down to the 5th string and go 4 frets to the left ... same note.

Example: You're looking for an F. On the second string that's on the 8th fret. Go two down and two to the right ... then the F is on the 4th string 10th fret. Go down 1 string and 4 to the left. The f on the 5th string is on the 6th fret.

There you go. All you need to know well are the notes on the 1st and 2nd string. The rest you can find with the "magic triangle".


edit:I think this is a good example on finding the "f"s. Just move the triangle left and right as needed.
While this works in identifying notes, it is not effective in learning to become completely intuitive with the notes on the fretboard. Your goal should be to be able to identify any fret on any string with its note name independently. Identifying it by relating it to its lower octave on another string is a step that gets in the way.
 
Dec 6, 2006
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Chicago
#12
Hey guys, I'm a pretty decent intermediate player when it comes to being a self taught person. However, now that I'm taking lessons and learning how to read notation it is obviously very crucial for me to be able to know where all of the notes on the guitar are.
Ask your teacher, he's there for a reason and can help you out a lot. Also, practice, practice, practice. It will probably come with time.
 
Nov 23, 2005
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#13
There is one very good method which I think is called the "magic triangle".

If you are looking for a note on the 3rd or or 6th string do this:

Look for the note on the 1st (low E) now go down to strings and two frets to the right ... that's the same note (on the 3rd). Go from there to the 6th (high E) and go back two frets ... same note again.

Example ... you're looking for a G: G on the low E is on the 3rd fret. Go down two strings and two frets to the right. The G on the 3rd string is on the 5th fret. Go down to the high E and back two frets and you'll have the G on that string.

Here's the second method for finding notes on the 2nd, 4th and 5th string: Find the note on the 2nd. Go down two strings and 2 frets to the right ... same note. Now go down to the 5th string and go 4 frets to the left ... same note.

Example: You're looking for an F. On the second string that's on the 8th fret. Go two down and two to the right ... then the F is on the 4th string 10th fret. Go down 1 string and 4 to the left. The f on the 5th string is on the 6th fret.

There you go. All you need to know well are the notes on the 1st and 2nd string. The rest you can find with the "magic triangle".


edit:I think this is a good example on finding the "f"s. Just move the triangle left and right as needed.
Ah, yes. I know what you're talking about, but I already know how to do that differently. The way I do it is by using five octave shapes that are also a part of every scale and chord used in guitar. I'm not sure what the specific name for these patterns are, but they're used in the book Guitar Fretbook Workbook. Knowing those shapes is VERY helpful, but just like the guys said knowing where a note is independently is a better way to go. I guess I will just do it one string at a time.

Thanks guys!