ohmyfrkkin garsh!

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Karly

giggity
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#1
did anyone hear about this guy named Scott Zacky who was thrown off a flight because of his t-shirt. He was wearing a shirt that said good bush bad bush & it as a pic of a womens genitals blacked out & a pic of george bush. Seems kinda big brotherish to me.
 
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#2
I think that the "bush" part had little to do with it. The shirt was sexually explict and the airline had every right to remove him.
 

Karly

giggity
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#5
Bergs said:
Mami, do you have the reason the air line said he had to be removed?

nope i dont- i caught the end of the interview on countdown with Keith Olberman. He said he was asked to get off the flight because some passengers found the shirt "offensive". Which is bullshit I say.
 

Bergs

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#6
Well of course thats what he said. I want to know what the air line's reason was.
 
3

321 gizzo

#7
they better have given him his money back. also, they could have asked him to turn it inside out. if i was that airline, i wouldnt care if he had it on. people have their opinions in politics. babies on an airplane offend me, with their crying and stuff, so why dont they throw babies off the plane?
 

Karly

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#8
it all about big brother watching us. I find it disgusting because this is "free" country. Free for who though?
 

wils0646

Exoskeletal Junction
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#9
mamichuli said:
it all about big brother watching us. I find it disgusting because this is "free" country. Free for who though?
How is it related to the "Big Brother" watching us? The airline made their own decision on the matter. The decision was probably made at their own discretion.
 

Bergs

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#10
mamichuli said:
it all about big brother watching us. I find it disgusting because this is "free" country. Free for who though?
Again you cant say anything like that until you hear the airline's reason. Quit jumping to conclusions based on your hatred of all things Bush.
 

Karly

giggity
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#11
Here is the transcprit from the show last night.
ppl are just way too sensitive imo.



OLBERMANN: Rather than tease out one of our typical long-winded introductions to tonight‘s No. 1 story, we‘ll going to give you a warning. The topic matter, even in the careful way we intend to present it, might be offensive to you or confusing to any kids who might be watching with it. It might just be weird.

It pertains to a T-shirt that somewhat graphically portrays a play on words you could make using the president‘s last name and what an airline did to a passenger who wore the T-shirt on one of their flights. We‘re even going to give you a related story first to give you time to decide whether or not you want to see this.

First to the airport in Birmingham, England, where a teddy bear, some fruit and some clothes have gotten a Portuguese man sentenced to 10 days in jail. They were in the carry-on bag of Jose De Silva, a bag which he left in the departure area of his flight back in Portugal while he went outside to have a smoke. Somebody noticed the unattended bag and before you knew it, 1,000 passengers and staff had been evacuated, three incoming flights diverted, 15 departures grounded and the airport closed for three hours.

British police charged Mr. De Silva with creating a public nuisance. The judge has sentenced him to 10 days in jail for leaving his bag unattended.

That did not happen to Mr. Scott Zacky. He only got thrown off his flight. Going from Oakland to L.A. with his wife, Mr. Zacky went casual, wearing a T-shirt under a button-=down shirt, only the top three buttons of which were undone. As he board the Southwest Airlines jet, a flight attendant told him he would have to cover up that T-shirt completely, that it was—quote—“offensive.”

He did so without making a scene. The airline doesn‘t even dispute that. But then he asked them how he could file a complaint. That‘s when they threw him and his wife off the plane. Stand by for the T-shirt.

Now, you‘ll notice we altered this just slightly. You‘ll probably get the idea anyway. If you don‘t, whatever you do, don‘t ask mom or dad to explain it to you.

The owner of the shirt, Scott Zacky, joins us now from Los Angeles.

Good evening, sir.

SCOTT ZACKY, THROWN OFF FLIGHT FOR T-SHIRT: Good evening.

OLBERMANN: So did you get thrown off that plane because you were wearing that T-shirt or because you asked the flight attendant how to file a complaint?

ZACKY: I think that‘s still unclear to us. The shirt was completely covered, so I believe it had to been I was going to complain.

OLBERMANN: We called Southwest obviously to get their side of the story. And their spokesman said: “One of our pilots took offense to his T-shirt and asked that he be removed from the flight. He,” meaning you, “was accommodated on the very next flight.”

Did the pilot—do we know, did the pilot dislike the politics or did the pilot dislike the woman in the illustration?

ZACKY: You know, it‘s unclear. I wish the pilot was more concerned with piloting the aircraft and the safety of the crew.

It‘s remarkable to me that this is—that he‘s capable of this and removing us from the plane. Obviously, he had made up his mind. And I like the choice of words, accommodated on the next flight. I don‘t know how—I made a reservation, not an accommodation.

OLBERMANN: They put you on next flight and nobody said anything about it; everybody was fine with you wearing that shirt under this other shirt on this next flight?

ZACKY: Didn‘t have to change an outfit, went right on the next flight. It was incredible. It seemed confusing even to the ground crew in Oakland. I have to say, they were even perplexed.

OLBERMANN: I keep thinking as we‘re looking at this T-shirt—and let me say what it says without—we show it—now drop it, so I can just say what it says. Just drop the illustration for a second, guys. It says, “Good Bush, Bad Bush.”

I keep thinking of the TV ad that used to run with the woman who opens a beer with her belt buckle and the bottle foams over. And the announcer says, “Get yourself a Busch.” I guess the pun is OK in advertising that can be seen by millions of people, but not in public on a flight that contained, what, 100, 200 people?

ZACKY: Or under another shirt. I mean, thank God they didn‘t go through my luggage. I had bought T-shirts on this trip, this being the least of the provocative ones.

OLBERMANN: I guess I‘ll just leave that alone. Maybe the guy had—maybe they have better X-rays at the airports than we know about.

Are you going to sue?

ZACKY: Well, going back to that word, I‘m going to accommodate them, with counsel if possible.

(LAUGHTER)

ZACKY: I think it was way too extreme, and they‘re getting carried away. And for one pilot to be able to remove somebody for something that offended him or her is going way too far. And I think that I will probably pursue at least what my options are.

OLBERMANN: On the premise of what? Do you feel you were damaged or are you just trying to protect the Constitution or what?

(CROSSTALK)

ZACKY: Well, we were embarrassed and humiliated. It was uncalled for. I completely cooperated and complied. You know, when you think of somebody being thrown off an airplane, for people to hear you were thrown off an airplane or asked to get off an airplane, it sends the wrong signal.

And this was something that my wife and I were both thrown off. And it was embarrassing and humiliating. I think I want maybe Southwest and other airlines to draw a more defined line as to what they can remove somebody from a plane for or not.

OLBERMANN: Last question, political vetting, we have to ask. Everything that concerns with politics, you‘ve got to ask political vetting. Can you tell us what your politics are?

ZACKY: Republican, surprisingly enough.

(CROSSTALK)

ZACKY: I bought this...

(CROSSTALK)

OLBERMANN: Why did you have the T-shirt?

ZACKY: I bought the shirt because I thought it was funny. You know, I don‘t draw political lines when it comes to humor. I think it was a funny shirt. The place that I got it had a lot of funny shirts. And I don‘t think it‘s—I think, especially up in San Francisco—I bought it in Haight Ashbury. I think that‘s one of the free speech capitals. And it was an incredible experience.

OLBERMANN: Yes, indeed. Scott Zacky, thanks for sharing that experience with us and good luck as you pursue this further.

ZACKY: Thank you. Thank you very much, Keith.
 

Karly

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#14
you dont find that a bit ridiculos Bergs? It was a t-shirt that was covered up! Ppl are way too easily offended.
 

Bergs

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#15
I still havent heard the airline's side of the story. What they said the airline said doesnt count.
 
T

tourettes

#16
look, i'm much more sympothetic towards the man who just left his bag unattended and ended up in jail. the fact is that the shirt was sexually explicit and that it was a public flight. "big brother"?. this has nothing to do with that. granted, it is a matter of censourship, but i always pictured "big brother" being government-oriented and this was the decision of a private airport.
if this pisses some people off so much, i'd like to tell them about the time an elderly man and his son were asked by mall security to remove their "offensive shirts" in a mall in the states. they were plain t-shirts that read:"give peace a chance". (sorry, i couldn't find a news article to link).
 
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#17
I think the issue is that regardless of what the Airports formal statement is. Either the pilot or the stewardess acted outside of their boundaries by taking the initiative to remove a peron from a flight. Unless you can show me where Southwest's policy includes removing people who cover up obscene images. Someone on that crew acted irresponsibly on a whim and thats unprofessional and unfair.

And as for the guy who was arrested for leaving his brief case that sucks but I think that the courts were fair in that case. Its just not smart to do something like that in an aiport nowadays. And even if he forgot thats careless. You should always be paying attention to where your bags. The current situation doesn't allow for any leniency on the matter.
 

shade

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#18
you dont find that a bit ridiculos Bergs? It was a t-shirt that was covered up! Ppl are way too easily offended.
I see someone who was politely asked to cover his offensive shirt (I sure as hell wouldnt want my 7 year old to see it) and could have just covered his shirt, but no, he had to escalate the situation in some idealistic "liberal protest."

i'd like to tell them about the time an elderly man and his son were asked by mall security to remove their "offensive shirts" in a mall in the states. they were plain t-shirts that read:"give peace a chance".
I think it said something more along the lines of "Fuck Bush."
 

droogsteve

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#19
tourettes said:
look, i'm much more sympothetic towards the man who just left his bag unattended and ended up in jail.
I'm not. It's made very clear at airports that you're not allowed to leave bags unattended. In JFK they have signs everywhere and make loudspeaker announcements every couple of minutes. Since every threat has to be taken seriously, whenever someone leaves a bag unattended the terminal has to be evacuated and the bomb squad brought in. Flights are delayed, causing many people to miss connecting flights which completely screws up their travel plans. Landings also have to be delayed, backing up traffic for hours. THOUSANDS of people are fucked because some idiot had to go outside to smoke. Fuck him. Ten days in jail seems fair to me.