Temple of the Golden Pavillion

Oct 20, 2004
3,364
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#1
I doubt very many of you will be interested in this. These are my favorite scenes from the movie Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters. Everytime I see these scenes, the hair on the back of my neck stands up. I highly recommend this film. It's a true story about Yukio Mishima, a truly amazing individual (more below):

Mishima - Mizoguchi Part One

Mishima - Mizoguchi Part Two

Yukio Mishima (三島 由紀夫, Mishima Yukio?) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka (平岡 公威, Hiraoka Kimitake?, January 14, 1925—November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his nihilistic post-war writing and the circumstances of his ritual suicide.​
 
Oct 20, 2004
3,364
9
0
#4
i'm half way tha first part and i dig it. good post i'm sure tha rest will make me think. if anything wierd happens i'll edit my comments, lol.

Edit: why didn't he stutter in thee end? And I'm lost...where i'm i...who i'm i?
Glad you liked it. You should see the whole movie. Mishima was an amazing person. You can torrent it if you like.

He stopped stuttering for a few reasons : (1) he got laid, and (2) he realized what his purpose in life was, to destroy the Golden Pavilion (beauty).

The Temple of the Golden Pavilion (金閣寺; Kinkakuji) is a novel by the Japanese author Yukio Mishima. It was published in 1956 and translated into English by Ivan Morris in 1959.

The novel is loosely based on the burning of Kyoto's Kinkaku-ji Temple by a young Buddhist acolyte in 1950. The temple was a national monument which had been spared by the American bombers during the Second World War, and the arson shocked Japan. The story is narrated by Mizoguchi, the young man who will burn the temple, who is afflicted with an ugly face and a stutter, and who recounts his obsession with beauty and the growth of his urge to destroy it. The novel also includes one of Mishima's most memorable characters, Mizoguchi's club-footed, deeply cynical friend Kashiwagi, who gives his own highly individual twist to various Zen parables.(koan)​

This novel provided insight into the mind of Mishima himself. Mishima desired to restore Japan to it's honorable Samurai heritage. Part of the Samurai mentality was to ends one's life at one's prime. For a Samurai, there is nothing worse than to slowly fade away.